Medical Institutional Review Board

Health Research Oversight

The Mission of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Medical Institutional Review Board

(MIRB) is to protect the Tribe and its members, to ensure a mutual and beneficial partnership between the Cherokee people and researchers, and to ensure that all health-related research activities respect, promote, and benefit the health of EBCI Tribal members.

BACKGROUND
The EBCI Medical Institutional Review Board was founded in 2000 by Tribal Resolution (Resolution No. 187 [2002]) as a sister IRB to the EBCI Cultural Institutional Review Board (CIRB) to assure expertise in review and assessment of health-related research proposals. The MIRB comprises nine medical, public health, behavioral health, legal, cultural, and community representatives with experience in evaluation of research, and the membership is always majority enrolled American Indian/Alaska Native. The MIRB is housed in the Public Health and Human Services Division (PHHS) and supported by the Secretary of PHHS. The MIRB maintains registration with the US Department of Health and Human Services Office for Human Research Protections (US DHHS OHRP), and is compliant with US 45 CFR.

Why EBCI Has An Institutional Review Board

For many generations, research has been conducted on Native populations with varying regard for their autonomy, sovereignty, safety, privacy, and benefit, and often without their participation or proper permission. There have been instances of profound damage to Tribal cultures and individuals as a result of research performed by outside entities.

The establishment of Tribal IRBs is a powerful means to bring the evaluation and approval process for research requests into the hands of those who will most benefit from, or be harmed by, these requests. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians has complete and final say over any health-related or cultural research proposals and their results performed in the EBCI community — that is, on Tribal lands or on any member of the Tribal community — to protect our people and lands and to assure that any research performed has applicability to EBCI and potential benefits to the community.

Research Approval Process

The MIRB meets on an ad hoc basis to review research protocol submissions. Please be aware that the entire approval process takes a minimum of one month and may take up to five months. Because of the necessity to submit a Resolution and present a proposal to Tribal Government, there is no “fast track” process for proposal approval.

No research may be conducted on EBCI Tribal Lands without explicit approval by the EBCI Cultural or Medical IRB and a Tribal Resolution.

If any member of the Tribal community knows of any research being conducted on Tribal lands that has not been approved by the MIRB or the CIRB, please contact us immediately at mirb@nc-cherokee.com.

To reach the Cultural Institutional Review Board, contact Bo Taylor at botayl@nc-cherokee.com or (828)-346-6898.​

MIRB
Medical Institutional Review Board

43 John Crowe Hill
PO Box 666
Cherokee, NC 28719

Megan Yates
Administrator
email
828-359-6185

Hours:
Monday – Friday
7:45 am – 4:30 pm

Continuing Review Of research 

The MIRB requires each researcher to provide a review of their proposal‘s progress every 12 months at minimum from the date of  approval. Also, the MIRB requires that researchers submit a copy of manuscripts or publications that result from the research proposal before they are published. If the research project has any adverse results, the researcher must report these to the MIRB immediately.

EBCI MIRB: Important Documents

The following list comprises documents that are important to the submission process.  Please review the Process Flow Chart and Instructions for Protocol Submission before completing the protocol submission, and review the Informed Consent Checklist before submitting an informed consent form.

EBCI Research Project Results: What Did This Research Show?

June 2019. O’Connell, University of Colorado-Denver: “Improving Health Care Delivery Project: The Health Status, Service Utilization, and Treatment Costs of American Indians with Diabetes

June 2019. O’Connell, University of Colorado-Denver: “Improving Health Care Delivery Project: Utilization of Education, Case Management, and Advanced Practice Pharmacy Services

Disclaimer

EBCI Public Health and Human Services (PHHS) use a variety of social media options to communicate and interact with the public. Those sites and applications include popular social networking and media sites, such as Pinterest, Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. These social networking and media sites are operated by a third party, therefore your activity on these third party sites is governed by the security, privacy policy, and user agreements of those sites, which we have linked to below.

You should review the third-party security, privacy policies, and user agreements before using the sites and ensure that you understand how your information may be used. If you have an account with a third-party Web site, and choose to follow, like, friend, or comment certain information associated with your account may be made available to PHHS based on the privacy policy of the third-party Web site and your privacy settings within that third-party Web site. Therefore, you should also adjust privacy settings on your account to match your preferences.

It is the policy of PHHS that any comments that contain spam or are improper, inflammatory, off-topic or offensive shall be removed. Repeat offenders may be subject to banning.

EBCI PHHS strives to make the information contained on these third party sites as timely and accurate as possible, PHHS makes no claim, promise, or guarantee about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the contents on these third party sites, and expressly disclaims liability for errors and omissions in the contents of these sites. Items posted on these third party sites do not necessarily reflect the views or act as endorsements by EBCI PHHS.